Total Government And Personal Debt In The U.S. Has Hit 41 Trillion Dollars ($329,961.34 Per Household)

We are living in the greatest debt bubble in the history of the world.  In 1980, total government and personal debt in the United States was just over the 3 trillion dollar mark, but today it has surpassed 41 trillion dollars.  That means that it has increased by almost 14 times since Ronald Reagan was first elected president.  I am searching for words to describe how completely and utterly insane this is, but I am coming up empty.  We are slowly but surely committing national suicide, and yet most Americans don’t even understand what is happening.

According to 720 Global, total government debt plus total personal debt in the United States was just over 3 trillion dollars in 1980.  That broke down to $38,552 per household, and that figure represented 79 percent of median household income at the time.

Today, total government debt plus total personal debt in the United States has blown past the 41 trillion dollar mark.  When you break that down, it comes to $329,961.34 per household, and that figure represents 584 percent of median household income.

If anyone can make a good argument that we are not in very serious debt trouble, I would love to hear it.

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Federal Reserve Says Not To Worry About A Financial Crisis – That Means You Should

Most people haven’t studied economics and don’t understand the contributing factors that led to the Great Recession, so they still view the Federal Reserve as a hero that saved the country from total collapse. But those who are informed understand that the financial bubbles seen over the last 20 years have been directly caused by reckless central bank intervention in the markets.

The supposed ‘expert officials’ at the Fed never seem to warn of a recession ahead of time but, instead, consistently encourage investors to buy in right before the bottom drops out. The Fed’s arrogance was on display yet again this week as chairman Janet Yellen made a bold statement about America’s economic future.

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Will the Crazy Global Debt Bubble Ever End?

We’ve been playing two games to mask insolvency: one is to pay the costs of rampant debt today by borrowing even more from future earnings, and the second is to create wealth out of thin air via asset bubbles.

The two games are connected: asset bubbles require leverage and credit. Prices for homes, stocks, bonds, bat guano futures, etc. can only be pushed to the stratosphere if buyers have access to credit and can borrow to buy more of the bubbling assets.

If credit dries up, asset bubbles pop: no expansion of debt, no asset bubble.

The problem with these games is the debt-asset bubbles don’t actually expand the collateral (real-world productive value) supporting all the debt. Collateral can be a physical asset like a house, but it can also be the ability to earn money to service debt.

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Bill Introduced Allowing Cancellation Of Over $1 Trillion In Student Debt Through Bankruptcy

Courtesy of Sov Man’s Simon Black, here are several of the most bizarre legal anecdotes to take place in the US and around the globe over the past week, staring with a bill currently making its way through Congress, which is seeking to wipe out over $1 trillion in student loans.

A Convenient Way to Cancel a Trillion Dollars of Debt

What happened:

Bankruptcy is like the ultimate get out of jail free card. You just get to wipe the slate clean, and even though your credit score and ability to borrow might suffer, you are free from all your previous obligations. But student loans have long been exempted from being erased by bankruptcy.

If this bill passes Congress however, hundreds of billions of currently delinquent student loans, potentially as much as $1.4 trillion worth of student loan debt…

…. would be eligible to be wiped out by declaring bankruptcy.

As the number of those defaulting on their student loans grows, this provision could be widely used by those seeking to escape their college debt….continue reading

 

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