Globalism And Why We Hate Each Other

We shouldn’t make the mistake of thinking that the current escalations in political rhetoric and acts of violence are divorced from these broader globalist trends.

One of the most persistent problems within the coverage of politics today is the lack of definition of commonly used terms. This is particularly irritating within the policy space, but it inhabits the legal and political space as well, given a commentariat that typically must cram their points into 30 second bites – 15 seconds if you are on one of CNN’s infamous Council of Trent panels. A term that is particularly lacking in this arena is how we define “globalism” and “globalists”. We have been talking about them for years, and still we lack a real definition of what this term means. Globalism can certainly mean NAFTA, the WTO, and maintaining post-war order in Europe. It can mean Angela Merkel-like technocracy, the global system of property rights, a lenient attitude toward borders and a welcoming attitude toward Middle Eastern refugees. As a general rule, this mindset is well represented by Bret Stephens, whose book stressed the importance of being the world’s policeman, and whose latest column has a tongue in cheek call (I assume) for deporting Americans who don’t excel at the things he values.  So globalism can also be an abiding belief that a nation is just where you happen to be walking about at a particular time.

Except that when you talk to people who are most bothered by creeping globalism, they don’t typically mention these issues – except the issue of refugees, but then they nearly always mention it in the context of fear of terrorism, which the globalists are not fans of, either. No one who has raised the issue of globalism with me has mentioned NAFTA, or trade deals, or even Angela Merkel. What is more commonly mentioned are the perceived beneficiaries of the globalist project: big businesses. And what often comes up is not the products they sell, but the ideology they push.

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