Two White Women Forced to Close Burrito Shop Because of “Cultural Appropriation”

There may not be a single notion among leftists that is more groan inducing than cultural appropriation. These people flip their lids every time someone borrows an idea from another culture. To them you’re a racist if you act, speak, or dress like anyone who isn’t from your tribe, or if you even celebrate their holidays. And of course, it generally only applies to white people, as if they’re going to ruin every culture they touch.

Now this petty belief is ruining reputations and livelihoods. It Portland, Oregon, it forced two successful food truck owners to close up shop. Kali Wilgus and Liz ‘LC’ Connelly, who are two white women, started a burrito business several months ago called Kooks Burritos. It was an instant hit. Last week they revealed in an interview with a local newspaper, that they had learned some of their recipes during a trip to Mexico.

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Read their YELP reviews too!!

 

How Would Corporate Tax Reform Benefit Workers?

Reducing the tax on capital income by reducing the corporate tax rate would undoubtedly result in an increase in capital investment, most economists would agree. Bob Lucas, the nobel-prize winning economist at the University of Chicago, once remarked that reducing or eliminating taxation on capital income was the closest thing he has ever seen to a free lunch, in terms of the concomitant increase in investment and economic growth that would create.

However, in the debate over the current tax reform, few people have discussed the impact that a lower corporate tax rate would have on the labor market. In a research paper forthcoming in Tax Notes, Andrew Hanson of Marquette University and I look at the empirical literature that examines the impact that corporate taxation has on the labor market—an aspect of tax reform that is not as well understood.

Put broadly, there are two different channels through which a lower capital tax rate can impact labor market decisions. The first is via the substitution effect: a lower capital tax rate makes plant and equipment cheaper, so firms have an incentive to substitute capital for labor.

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13 More Major Fake News Stories In Five Months Of Trump’s Presidency

With Donald Trump in the White House, the media is increasingly apathetic towards, if not antipathetic to, the truth.

We are merely five months into the presidency of Donald J. Trump, and still in the midst of a fake news epidemic. It has grown more subtle and refined over time—gone is the regular cycle of industrial-scale media ineptitude and stupidity that began shortly after Trump clinched the presidency—but it is still chugging on like one of those old-fashioned Kalamazoo hand-pump railway cars: slow and quiet but somehow weirdly inexorable.

At a certain point we must ask ourselves why. We know the media are overwhelmingly liberal, deeply hostile towards Trump’s presidency and conservatives generally, and thus must feel rather strained and desperate when their arch-nemesis-apparent holds the White House and Republicans command an historic amount of political power throughout the country. Heady times will drive anyone batty.

Yet this still does not explain its relentless nature. Trump administration or no, majority Republican governor bloc or no, after a cursory freak-out it shouldn’t be that hard for journalism to return to square one. The news media have one job, and it is to report facts: factual things, things that are true, things that are the opposite of false. It should not be difficult to do this.

Yet for many of our media leaders, it apparently is. This, to the great discredit of the American fourth estate, is the media we have. What follows are 13 more examples of the post-election trend I tracked in an earlier article counting 16 others.

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Key Takeaways From CBO Score of the Republican Health Care Bill

The Congressional Budget Office (CBO) updated their score of the House-passed American Health Care Act (AHCA) this week, prior to its being sent over to the Senate.

This budgetary analysis projects that if passed into law, the AHCA would reduce the number of insured by 23 million, but would decrease the deficit by $119 billion while also reducing federal outlays by $1.1 trillion and federal revenue by $992 billion.

While the score is roughly similar to the score from the original version of the AHCA released on March 23, several modifications to the law occurred since then and were not reflected in earlier estimates.

The new CBO score addresses the effect of allowing states to waive the Affordable Care Act essential health benefit and community rating requirements on premiums in particular.

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CBO’s 23 Million Uninsured Under GOP’ Not What It Seems

Democrats use report from agency with flawed record to slam health plan

Democrats and much of the mainstream news media Wednesday poured cold water on the the House Republicans’ American Health Care Act, citing a report from the Congressional Budget Office that the legislation to begin dismantling Obamacare would result in 23 million uninsured in the next 10 years.

“The CBO was wrong when they analyzed Obamacare’s effect on cost and coverage, and they are wrong again,” Health and Human Services Secretary Tom Price countered in a statement.

“In reality, Americans are paying more for fewer health-care choices because of Obamacare, and that’s why the Trump administration is committed to reforming health care.”

House Republicans passed the bill three weeks ago without waiting for the CBO to release a score for the legislation. It replaced an earlier version of the AHCA that the CBO had said would result in 24 million being without insurance.

But the figures of those left without insurance, at least as widely reported, is misleading. It includes nine million already without coverage under Obamacare. The remaining 14 million are made up of those who could potentially lose coverage under the new bill, plus those who take advantage of the AHCA eliminating the mandate to purchase coverage. For the latter group, being allowed to remain uninsured is a positive option. The requirement to be covered under Obamacare or pay a penalty has been an unpopular feature of the present health law.

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Did Fake Document Inspire Comey Decision?

The FBI received a purported Russian intelligence report that may have convinced former FBI Director James Comey to prematurely shut down an investigation into whether Hillary Clinton intentionally revealed classified information through her use of a private email server.

According to the FBI’s own assessment, however, the document was bad intelligence and may have been sent to the FBI to delibarately confuse the Bureau.

The report, given to the FBI by a source March 2016, detailed a supposed email in which then-Attorney General Loretta E. Lynch assured a Clinton campaign aide that investigators wouldn’t look too deeply into the matter, the Washington Post reported Wednesday.

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CBO: Obamacare Repeal Will Cut Deficit By $119 Billion, Leave 23 Million More Uninsured

The CBO has finally scored the House-passed healthcare bill, H.R.1628 (which as a reminder remains DOA in the Senate), and finds modest improvement relative to its last scoring of the proposed Healthcare bill as of March 23. Here are the apples to apples comparisons with the last proposed version of the bill:

  • Under the House-passed Bill, the US budget deficit would be reduced by $119 billion between 2017 and 2026. This is $31 billion less than the proposed March bill, which would have lowered the deficit by $150 billion.
  • Offsetting the smaller benefit on the deficit, the CBO found that the number of Americans expected to lose their health coverage would rise to 23 million in 2026, which is 1 million fewer than the 24 million forecast in March, or roughly $31 billion in spending over 10 years to provide 1 million Americans with insurance over the same time period.
  • The CBO concludes that in 2026, an estimated 51 million people under age 65 would be uninsured, compared with 28 million who would lack insurance that year under current law. Under the last CBO estimate, the number of Americans wihtout insurance in 2026 was 52 million of Americans under 65, so an improvement of 1 million as expected.

Below is the “bridge” of the budget deficit reduction from the CBO:

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